experimentation

The EU launches a new funding call for experimental innovation support programmes

By Albert Bravo-Biosca and James Phipps on Thursday, 9 November 2017.

We don’t typically write blogs to announce new European funding programmes, but the H2020 2018-2020 work programme just approved by the European Commission has good news for everyone who wants to see innovation agencies across Europe becoming more experimental and evidence-based.

Promoting experimentation in government – learning from Canada’s experience

By Giulio Quaggiotto and Shatha Alhashmi on Wednesday, 7 June 2017.

Back in 2015, the Canadian Prime Minister publicly released, for the first time, his instructions to all his ministers. Among these instructions, entitled mandate letters, one was particularly relevant to experimentation. It was addressed to the President of the Treasury Board of Canada, and it stated:

Towards an experimental culture in government: reflections on and from practice

By Jesper Christiansen, Bas Leurs, Giulio Qiaggiotto on Thursday, 27 April 2017.

If... Then...

Recent years have seen a growing interest and increasing uptake of experimental methods in government. Around the world, we see a growing number of governments taking up experimental approaches to tackle complex issues and generate better public outcomes.

Taking the first steps in business policy experimentation

By James Phipps on Friday, 10 February 2017.

Embarking on a journey of policy experimentation might be easier with just a first small step… Keen to encourage a culture of experimentation amongst policy makers, IGL has been examining the barriers that prevent its adoptions – finding that these include a reluctance to disrupt the status quo, fears of a backlash if ‘lotteries’ are used to allocate support or simply that evaluation is considered too late.

How to learn and improve on what we do in the rugged landscape of programmes and policies?

By Triin Edovald on Monday, 4 April 2016.

Puzzle pieces

As more and more governments attempt to base their policies on sound evidence, randomised controlled trials - the 'gold standard' in evaluation - are gaining a stronger role in determining which policies work. But are they really the best way to tell us which policies should be used? This blogpost explores how to improve our ability to learn and better design things that work.

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